Better than a light

This earth life is commonly seen as one big highway, winding its way through plains, hills, mountains, valleys, and tunnels. I’ve encountered all of the above plenty of times, and I can confidently say that I like the tunnels least of all.

Those are the moments where the future is uncertain and the road ahead can only be known one step at a time. My situation over the past few months has involved a lot of waiting to see how things would turn out and a lot of cautious step-by-step moves.

Yesterday, the uncertainty of it all enveloped me, quickly becoming a cloud of worry and spiritual darkness.

I prayed, “Lord, bring Your light into this,” and He brought to mind the wise, reassuring words from the poem, “The Gate of the Year.” I had heard them plenty of times before, but this time they spoke directly to me:

I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year,
“Give me a light that I may tread safely into the unknown.”
And he replied,
“Go into the darkness and put your hand into the hand of God.
That shall be to you better than light and safer than a known way.”
So I went forth, and finding the hand of God,
Trod gladly into the night.1

As a blind man, I can relate to needing assistance when on unfamiliar territory. The message this imparted to me was that I have to take God’s hand with the same confidence as when I hold the elbow of someone guiding me in the physical, and allow Him to guide me through this tunnel. As long as I’m holding onto Him, I don’t need to be concerned about the length of the tunnel or what awaits me at its end. I can walk with Him step by step, trusting that I will reach the other side safe and sound.

I may not have any idea what’s on the road ahead of me. But the one I’m walking with and who is guiding me sees and knows the road I’m on. I can trust Him to get me through the tunnels of this life, and so can you. When things get dark, don’t give in to panic or be overwhelmed by uncertainty. Simply take the hand of the one who has promised to be better than a light for us all, and you will make it safely through whatever your tunnel may be.

  1. Minnie Louise Haskins (1875–1957)